Browsing Tag

introduction

THE BODY AS A PRISON - November 2018

Introduction: The Body As A Prison

Dear Infected,

The body is a delicately balanced composition of limbs, organs, fluids, textures. It is a collectively working series of systems, forming an organism with reflexes, motor skills, gut feelings, and muscle memories. The body, both the lens through which we experience the world and the physical material that makes us part of it, continually adapts and evolves within our lifespans – and the larger span of time.

And yet, despite only knowing life through our bodies, at times we begin to feel trapped, dissatisfied, or uncomfortable. With the chemical balances of our bodies. With the limited timeframe of being singular entities. With the dissonance between the way we feel and the way we are seen.

The body can begin to feel like something from which we wish to escape.

This month we hope to explore these dissonances: What lies behind the feeling that our bodies are miss-fit? How have people around the world, and throughout history, dealt with this notion? Where do we search for symbiosis? Who has inspired us out of this clash? Why does the clash even exist?

This month, our staff writers are channeling their own experiences, memories, and knowledge towards the topic, The Body As A Prison, hoping to unpack it, one creation at a time.

If you have any perspectives to share, hunches to work out, or images to show, we welcome you to make a contribution.

All our best,

The Pandemic Team

 
FILTERED RECOLLECTIONS - October 2018

October 2018 – Filtered Recollections

Dear Infected,

We revisit the past for all sorts of reasons. Whether it’s out of nostalgia, melancholia, or in order to understand the present: our memories form an integral part of day-to-day life.

We need to remember in order to learn. People create their personal identities through coherent narratives of their pasts. A constructed sense of self is not limited to the individual, our collective memories are interwoven into a history of us as a community.

In our fast-paced world, we tend to be pre-occupied with the future. However understandable this may be, it may be wise to reflect upon experiences from days gone by. Of course in the act of recalling a memory, we risk changing it so all of our past is filtered through who we are in the present. You may never know what you could learn from probing into the depths of your own mind. Your past may provide you with crucial insights you need today.

As a society when we want to remember something, we create monuments. We would like for you to think of Pandemic as a monument to yourself as we invite you to submit a creation for October’s issue, Filtered Recollections.

Lest we forget,

The Pandemic Team

Issues THE CITY - April 2018

April Issue: The City

Dear Infected,

Spring is here, even if it doesn’t always feel like it. The cold no longer keeps us shuttered up in our homes, the streets of are once again filling with life. The parks become covered by picnic blankets. Tourists flock everywhere, locals now must avoid. Life in a city changes with the seasons, and this month we would like to reflect experience.

The modern city is a relatively recent development, with the most dramatic period of rapid urbanization taking place just in the 20th century. The next decade will see even more migration into urban centers, until 6 out every 10 people are living in an urbanized environment.

Every individual experiences their city differently. Cities can be both inspiring and suffocating, energizing and draining, supportive and crushing. As ever-taller buildings spring up around us, and urban centers expand their limits further outwards, cities have become where society develops. We are left with little choice but to confront the lifestyles, opportunities, and emotions they provoke, along with the consequences, whether positive or negative, of an increasingly-urbanized planet.

For April we ask inspired writers to tell stories and share ideas about “the city.” Whether you want to focus on historical migration patterns, urban technological planning, or poetic descriptions is up to you, all we ask is that you share it with the Pandemic community.

We look forward to hearing from you! Go ahead and click on one of the images below to start reading. 

The Pandemic Team